Cancer Support Group

Tuesday, Nov 12th

Last update:06:42:40 AM GMT

Home News and Update Year 2010 In East, Meat Fuels Colon Cancer

In East, Meat Fuels Colon Cancer

Times of India
12 March 2010
By Prithvijit Mitra
Kolkata, India

A group of researchers in Kolkata has solved a mystery that has always intrigued oncologists – the continuing rise in the number of colon cancer patients in eastern India. Following a five–year study that began in 2005, they have concluded that it is related to the consumption of red meat, which is much higher in this part of the country than in the rest of India.

Colon cancer patients constitute 8–9% of the cancer–afflicted population in the region. In southern India, it is less than 1%. A study of dietary patterns and lifestyles of 3,627 cancer patients who sought treatment in Kolkata revealed that 8.22% had colon cancer. And 94% of those suffering from colon cancer were red meat eaters, while only 6% were vegetarians. Also, 99% of colon cancer patients were permanent residents of Bengal whereas only 1% came from other parts of the country. Those with colon cancer had a history of red meat intake, which was greater than 500 gm/week.

“We took their dietary details and family history. Most colon cancer patients were invariably red meat eaters and they consumed it in a fairly high quantity. Our studies suggest that 500 gm per week or 80 gm per day was the cut–off point, beyond which it could get risky. The worrying news is that the incidence of colon cancer in eastern India is very high even in comparison to the rest of the world,” said Ashish Mukhopadhyay, director of Netaji Subhas Chandra Bose Cancer Research Institute, which carried out the study in collaboration with scientists from NRS Medical College.

Researchers found that myoglobin produced while heating red meat generated iron that went through a reaction in the colon to produce hydroxin radicals. “These radicals are extremely harmful as they break up carbohydrates, proteins and nucleic acids and turn cancerous. This is the sentol reaction, which happens every time we consume mutton, lamb, beef, pork, ham or salami. The body’s natural defence mechanism acts as a shield. But regular intake in a large quantity could eventually break through the defence,” said NRS’ Monoj Kar, who is still working on the project.

Red Alert
  • Consumption of red meat is much higher in eastern India – patients constitute nearly 8–9% of the cancerafflicted population in the region. In southern India, it is less than 1%
  • 94% of those suffering from colon cancer were red meat eaters. Also, 99% of colon cancer patients were permanent residents of Bengal
  • 500 gm of red meat per week or 80 gm per day was the cut–off point, beyond which it can get risky
Disclaimer: The news story on this page is the copyright of the cited publication. This has been reproduced here for visitors to review, comment on and discuss. This is in keeping with the principle of ‘Fair dealing’ or ‘Fair use’. Visitors may click on the publication name, in the news story, to visit the original article as it appears on the publication’s website.

Suggestions

This is YOUR sites, so if you have suggestions or feedback on how we can improve it for you, please let us know! We do our best to keep up!

Make a Suggestion
Manthan Award

Link to Aarogya

aarogya logo
NASSCOM Award